Shank's Wii Super Thread

Discussion in 'Guide Submissions' started by Shank, Feb 17, 2016.

  1. Shank Certified Wiitard . .

    Joined:
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    About Shank's Series of Guides
    Shank's Guides are created as a separate entity unaffiliated with BitBuilt. The information within them should not be considered official BitBuilt Certified information, and have not been thoroughly tested like official BitBuilt guides have. Although not as stable as BitBuilt guides, Shank's guides are a permanent work-in-progress, and are updated with what is currently believed to be the most up to date and accurate information, even if it has not been technically confirmed.

    If you have any corrections or additions to the information within Shank's guides, please contact him and he will update the thread as soon as possible.
    Introduction
    This guide was written by Shank. In this guide, I will consolidate and summarize as much information about the wii as possible, while linking to other sources with more detailed information such as datasheets. I will continue to update this thread as much as possible. A lot of Wiis died for this. The contents of this guide are for use exclusively on BitBuilt and any other site Shank decides to crosspost it to.

    Also, HUGE thank you to the following users:
    Bentomo
    Cheese
    Gman
    JacksonS
    ShockSlayer
    Zenloc
    About the Wii
    Gamecube 2.0
    When the gamecube was released, it was incredibly powerful for its time. So powerful, in fact, that when it became time to release their next generation video game console, nintendo decided to upgrade the gamecube rather than create a new system. The processors are simply upgraded versions clocking in at 50% faster. In addition, a coprocessor, nicknamed Starlet, was added to handle new functionality such as SD and USB. But since it uses essentially the same processor, the wii handles all gamecube games perfectly, as they are running natively rather than being emulated. So this system can do everything a gamecube can do, and more. In fact, they even use the same modchips!

    A better gamecube than the gamecube
    First off, a wii uses significantly less power than a gamecube, including when running gamecube games. That means less heat generation and longer battery life in a portable when playing the same game. A wii also has component video natively, so you can play in beautiful progressive without having sell your kidney to buy a gamecube component cable. In addition, through apps such as nintendon't, you can use other USB/Bluetooth controllers, integrate hacks, emulate gamecube controllers, and so much more with gamecube games you couldn't do with a regular gamecube. You can use up to 2TB external storage (compared with limited storage of a modchip's SD card). Load times are significantly faster as well through USB. You don't even need to buy a modchip or any hardware to mod it; just a standard SD card and you are good to go! Emulators made for gamecube will actually run better on a Wii than a gamecube too!

    More than just a gamecube
    Obviously the wii can play gamecube and wii games. Something else to consider are virtual console and wiiware games. A large portion of classic games have been ported over to the wii. With homebrew, emulators for any retro system and apps for any purpose can be loaded and used from the system. A wii can play wii and gamecube games flawlessly, and is more than powerful enough to emulate all of nintendo's previous systems. So you by building a portable wii, you have a portable wii, gamecube, and retro emulation machine!

    "But you need a wii remote to navigate the menu and software"
    Nope! Homebrew has made remotes obsolete, unless you want to use it for games that require it. Here is a demonstration of just how great life is without the wii remote

    *Note: I have made this video unlisted on youtube

    AND IT COSTS LESS TOO
    Aside from the cost saved by not having to buy a modchip, Wiis are more abundant and cheaper than gamecubes. I commonly pick them up for $10-30 on a regular basis.
    Wii sold millions and millions of consoles.
    -The motion gaming fad sold consoles to non gamers
    -The gamers who bought them got their share of good games
    However, wiis are no longer desired because:
    -Wii U is backwards compatible
    -Motion gaming fad died out
    -Dolphin allows emulation of gamecube and wii games
    Power and Voltage
    -The wii runs on about 11w-22w of power depending on the revision.
    --Varies based on revision. See revision guide for more info.
    --Board with HollyWood-1 =consumes less power
    -Wii's require at least 10.2v to boot when using stock regulators
    -The wii runs on 8 voltage sections, not including ground or RTC battery
    --VCC
    --1v
    --1.15v
    --1.8v
    --3.3v
    (only on while system is on)
    --3.3v Standby (always on)
    --5v
    --12v

    Notes on power rails:
    -12v stays at 12v, no matter what vcc is
    -2 Separate voltage 3.3v lines
    -14 pin IC controls shutoff of regulators
    -Vcc is unregulated power in, ideally 12v, but will operate on anything above 10.2v

    Here is everything the 5v line does as far as I know:
    Connects to the 5v regulation circuitry
    Runs through a section in the voltage layer
    Runs to 5v output line on av out port
    Connects to a transistor.
    -1 pin of transistor is connected to one of the 3 Japan only AV port pins
    -The other transistor runs to a pin on the video encoder
    Powers rumble pins on 4 gamecube controller ports
    Powers some Gamecube Memory Card pins
    Powers USB ports
    Runs to a transistor that runs to the cooling fan

    3.3v Lines
    On all Wiis other than the wii mini, there are two 3.3v lines. The second 3.3v line is unofficially known as the 3.3v standby line. This secondary voltage line is always on, even when the console is off. This allows components to be powered even when primary power is shut off. For example, the bluetooth module is powered by this line, which allows the console to be turned on remotely with a wiimote when the console is powered down. When running custom regs, the two lines can be merged and both powered by a single 3.3v line.

    Types of regulators
    Switching
    -5v
    -3.3v
    -3.3v Standby (RVL-60, RVK-01, RVK-02, and RVO-01 only)
    -1.15v
    -1v
    Linear
    -1.8v (LDO Regulator)
    -3.3v Standby (RVL 01, 20, 30, and 40 only)
    Other/unknown method
    -12v

    Here is a diagram of the capacitors, inductors, and linear regulators of the primary voltage lines:
    [​IMG]

    How the 1v, 1.15v, 3.3v, and 5v regulation works:
    On top of the board in the regulation section, there are several 8 pin transistors. They are simple MOSFET transistors. The transistors are controlled by the three large IC's on the bottom of the board, highlighted below. The ICs detect the voltage on the voltage line, and adjust the duty cycle of those transistors accordingly to regulate voltage.

    [​IMG]
    Daughterboards
    -The wii has 3 daughterboards:

    Disc Drive Board
    -Required to play any nintendo software or game
    --Includes, but not limited to, usb loading wii games, dios mios, and virtual console
    --Not required for nintendont
    --Will give you a "error has occurred... turn off console..." error if disc drive is cause
    ---Can be resolved by replugging ffc, replacing drive board, or replacing ffc
    -Requires FFC cable to run games
    -mixed reportiong on if disc drive board needs multi pin power connector to load games from SD/USB
    -Can be used without actual disc drive, just the board.
    -Has been emulated with mod chips.
    -Nobody has successfully spoofed it using software :(
    -Can be replaced with wiikey fusion or similar devices

    WiFi Board
    -Bigger of the two wireless cards. Has 2 antennas connected to it.
    -Required to boot
    -Not present on wii mini
    --Wii mini has solder pads and traces for wifi card
    --Wii mini boots without wifi card. This might mean the wii could be modded to do so as well
    -Communicates through SDIO protocol


    Bluetooth Board

    -Small board towards the front of the board
    -Used for wii remotes and other bluetooth controllers
    -Required for boot
    -Removing the sticker reveals test pads, useful solder points for relocation
    -Communicates through USB protocol
    Disc Drive Board
    Although there are many, many variants of chips that appear on the disc drive boards, they all come on one of 4 versions of the PCB.
    Version 1A
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Version 1B
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Version 2A
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Version 2B
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Wifi Module
    I have begun scratch the surface of the wifi module. I will post notes here.
    The Wifi module runs on the 3.3v line, but also seems to have some form of 1.8v onboard regulation.
    The wifi module supposedly communicates through USB protocol. It uses 2 antennas, a propriotary connector, and has 4 surface mounted Integrated circuits that can be viewed by removing the metal shielding.
    Currently, there are 4 documented revisions of the wifi module. Earlier versions had EMI shielding all around, while later ones only had EMI shielding just covering the integrated circuits.

    The Mystery Chunk
    There is a chunk of circuit board that has no connectivity with the board whatsoever unless the wifi module is connected. The only thing attached to that chunk are 1-2 filtration capacitors. Poking the section with a multimeter reads 1.8v reference to ground. This is interesting, as the wii's 1.8v line does not connect to the wifi module, so the module must have some form of onboard 1.8v regulation.
    This chunk and its filtration capacitors seem to be the cause of the current board failures when attempting to relocate the wifi module, but this is unconfirmed. The issue is still being looked into.

    IC 1: Broadcom BCM4318EKFBG

    IC 2: SkyWorks SE2521A60

    [Datasheet]

    VERSIONS
    There appear to be 2 different manufacturers of the Wifi Module, and each has 2 versions of it, for a total of 4 versions. So far, all my tests show that they are all cross compatible. Here are some pictures.


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Hollywood and Broadway Versions
    The CPU (Broadway) and GPU (Hollywood) were reworked several times throughout the lifetime of the Wii
    Documented Broadway Iterations:
    Broadway
    -90 nm
    -Larger Substrate
    Broadway A
    -90 nm
    -Larger Substrate
    Broadway B
    -65nm
    -Larger Substrate
    Broadway-1
    -65nm
    -Smaller Substrate

    Documented Hollywood Iterations:
    Hollywood
    -90 nm
    -Larger Substrate
    Hollywood AA
    -90 nm
    -Larger Substrate
    Hollywood-1
    -65nm
    -Larger Substrate
    -HUGE reduction in power consumption
    Revisions
    There are 8 wii revisions

    Here is an album of every wii board revision currently documented


    This information is covered in more detail in the Revision Guide below.


    And this is how you figure out which one you have
    [​IMG]

    If you can't remove the screw to check, such as when purchasing a wii online, you can ensure you get a 4 layer die shrunk (40 or 60) by purchasing a wii that has gamecube controller ports and isn't white. You can get a revision 40 or 60 from a white shell, but you will not find a revision 01, 20, or 30 in a red, black, or light blue wii. So again, buying a wii that isn't in a white shell ensures that you get one that is efficient and easier to cut.

    Another thing to note is that all wiis without gamecube controller ports (family edition) contain the efficient die shrunk chips. They also contain the circuitry and solder pads for gamecube ports. You should be able to solder new filters or simply bridge where the filters would go to re-add gamecube controller ports. Getting a console without the gamecube ports also ensures you will get a die shrunk chip.
    Revisions Guide
    Why the differences matter?

    The Wii made some rather drastic changes from board to board, mostly to reduce the cost. Newer boards feature simplified layouts, reduced parts, few layers, and drastic reductions in power consumption (close to 50% reduction!) and heat generation. This can make trimming easier, batteries last longer, and heat dissipation less of a concern. Some have gamecube ports. Some have gamecube solder pads and data lines for ports but no ports. Some have no gamecube ports at all. Some are soft-modable, and some are not soft-modable.

    How many revisions are there?


    There are 8 documented Revisions:

    RVL-CPU-01
    RVL-CPU-20
    RVL-CPU-30
    RVL-CPU-40
    RVL-CPU-60
    RVK-CPU-01
    RVK-CPU-02
    RVO-CPU-01

    There are also 3 more confirmed undocumented versions:

    RVL-CPU-10
    RVL-CPU-50
    RVO-CPU-10
    Shank is currently attempting to track down and document these rare revisions.

    The shorthands for the boards are as follows:
    01 - RVL1 - RVL-CPU-01
    10 - RVL10 - RVL-CPU-10
    20 - RVL20 - RVL-CPU-20
    30 - RVL30 - RVL-CPU-30
    40 - RVL40 - RVL-CPU-40
    50 - RVL50 - RVL-CPU-50
    60 - RVL60 - RVL-CPU-60
    K1 - RVK1 - RVK-CPU-01
    K2 - RVK2 - RVK-CPU-02
    M 1 - RVO2 - RVO-CPU-01
    M10 - RVO2 - RVO-CPU-10


    Other Notes:
    There are unconfirmed reports of an RVL-CPU-50 in the PAL region.
    There are currently no known differences between the RVK-01 and the RVK-02.

    How do I know which board a Wii has?

    There are 3 models of wiis.
    The Original:
    [​IMG]
    This one is identifiable by its gamecube ports on top and vertical orientation of the text on the front
    Possible Boards:
    White Original Wii
    RVL-CPU-10
    RVL-CPU-01
    RVL-CPU-02
    RVL-CPU-30
    RVL-CPU-40
    RVL-CPU-60

    Black Original Wii
    RVL-CPU-40
    RVL-CPU-60

    Red Original Wii
    RVL-CPU-40
    RVL-CPU-60

    Light Blue Original Wii
    RVL-CPU-40
    RVL-CPU-60

    The Family Edition:
    [​IMG]
    This system is easily identifiable by its horizontally oriented words and its omission of gamecube ports.

    There are some big misconceptions about this version, so I hope to clear them up. This system will not play gamecube games without modification. The disc drive was simplified to only accept wii discs to reduce cost, and the ports were removed as well. This system has solder pads for gamecube controller and memory card ports. Ports can be soldered on, and this system can USB/SD load gamecube games. I have not tested if it can load commercial gamecube games through swapping the DVD drive with one from an older wii, but it should work in theory unless there is some firmware block.

    Possible Boards (all colors):
    RVK-CPU-01
    RVK-CPU-02

    AGAIN, THE WII FAMILY EDITION HAS GAMECUBE PORT PADS AND CAN BE MODDED TO LOAD GAMECUBE BACKUPS. DONT LET THIS ONE DETER YOU, MODDERS.

    Wii Mini:
    [​IMG]
    This one can easily be identified by a significant redesign.

    When first announced, it showed promising modification potential. However, the loss of backwards compatibility and lack of modularity means this iteration is a poor choice for projects.

    Possible Boards:
    RVO-CPU-01
    RVO-CPU-10 (reported but undocumented)

    Here is what is known about the wii mini.
    -No gamecube support
    -No gamecube data lines or solder pads for controllers
    -No built in wifi
    -Firmware blocks use of LAN Adapter for wired internet
    -No SD slot
    -Currently un-softmodable
    -No component video or other means of outputting 480p
    -No virtual console games
    -Not much smaller than the wii

    Not the best choice for modders.

    TL;DR
    RVL boards came in Wiis with gamecube ports
    RVK boards came in Wiis without gamecube ports
    RVO boards came in Wii minis.

    Identifying Your Board


    There are 8 wii revisions

    Here is an album of every wii board revision currently documented



    And this is how you figure out which one you have
    [​IMG]
    This board says 01, so it is a RVL-CPU-01. RVL boards will have a 2 digit revision code, while RVK boards have a 2 digit code preceded by the letter K. RVL-60 and all RVK boards' codes can be viewed by looking at the silkscreen in the SD card slot.


    Getting a 4 Layer board:
    If you can't peek inside the battery tray door, here is a simple way to tell if your wii will have a compatible board based on shell color.
    [​IMG]





    RVL-CPU-01

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Layers: 6
    Die Size: 90nm
    Power Consumption: High
    Heat generation: High

    The first and most common iteration of the wii. It has lots of layers, and lots of components all over the board. Compared to later revisions it uses a lot of power (18-20w), and creates a significantly larger amount of heat. Trimming this one is difficuilt due to its 6 layer motherboard construction. Cutting beyond the gold ground shielding is possible, but not recommended.
    Since this revision can not be significantly reduced in size, requires larger heat sinks, and uses more power it should only be considered for use in larger portables.

    RVL-CPU-20

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Layers: 6
    Die Size: 90nm
    Power Consumption: High
    Heat generation: High


    The 20 is a slightly simplified version of the 01. Aside from slight modification to the power regulation section, it remains mostly unchanged. Just like the 01, it has many layers, high power consumption, high heat generation, and should only be considered for use in large portables.

    RVL-CPU-30


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Layers: 6
    Die Size: 90nm
    Power Consumption: High
    Heat generation: High

    Although the 30 contains a smaller substrate for the CPU, the GPU is not die shrunk. It has 6 layers and has almost the same power consumption and heat generation as the 20. Like the 01 and 20, revision is not a good choice for choice for portables.

    RVL-CPU-40


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Layers: 4
    Die Size: 65nm
    Power Consumption: Low
    Heat generation: Low

    The 40 is the most significant change yet, and it also marks the last significant change to the wii motherboard before the mini. As a cost cutting measure, the board was redesigned to use only 4 layers. All non-voltage traces were moved to the visible surface layer, making trimming this board significantly easier. If you plan to make a battery powered portable and you plan to trim it, this is one of your best options.

    RVL-CPU-60


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Layers: 4
    Die Size: 65nm
    Power Consumption: Low
    Heat generation: Low

    Can't tell the difference between the 40 and 60? It's quite subtle. One of the regulators was swapped out, specifically the 3.3v "always on" voltage line, from a linear regulator to a switching regulator. It is located above the wifi chip place and to the right of the MX chip. This slightly reduced power consumption even more, especially while in standby. Aside from this change the board is essentially identical to the 40, down to pretty much every single trace outside of said regulation circuitry. The 3.3v standby voltage line in the voltage layer also takes a slightly different route, so be sure all 3.3v standby areas are getting power when doing extreme cuts. All components made by SHARP have been removed and replaced, so this could be the reason for the change.

    RVK-CPU-01

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Layers: 4
    Die Size: 65nm
    Power Consumption: Low
    Heat generation: Low

    Despite changing the number system and starting over, the RVK didn't really change much. The board stayed essentially the same as the 60, but gamecube controller ports were not soldered on, and a section of the ground plane was cut to make way for a diagnostic port. The diagnostic port is wired to the memory card ports. It seems to be a proprietary plug. As mentioned earlier, gamecube data lines are still present, and ports can be soldered onto the board.


    RVK-CPU-02


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Layers: 4
    Die Size: 65nm
    Power Consumption: Low
    Heat generation: Low


    I have yet to find a difference between the RVK-01 and the RVK-02. The inductors look different, but using different types of inductors within the same revision is common. Different factories use different factory codes, so that is not the cause either.

    RVO-CPU-01

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Layers: 4
    Die Size: 65nm
    Power Consumption: Low
    Heat generation: Low

    The wii mini appears very similar to other 4 layer boards in layout, with surprisingly few things actually moved. It seems to use the same Hollywood-1 and Broadway-1 as the 40s and beyond. This board contains a few less peripherals but may contain the circuitry for most if not all of them. The console has not been hacked, but hacking it could be promising. The board does not contain a 3.3v standby line, and all things previously connected to it on later revisions have been connected to the standard 3.3v line instead.
    Layers
    Earlier Wiis have 6 Layers
    Newer Wiis have 4 Layers

    4 layer boards are easier to work with as the 6 layer ones are more complex and have many traces that aren't visible. I have only tried cutting the 4 layer boards successfully. Here are the layers of a 4 layer board from top to bottom:

    Top Visible layer: TRACES You can see this layer. It contains lots of traces
    Top Hidden Layer: GND. The ENTIRE layer is a single piece of grounded copper, (with exceptions)
    Bottom Hidden Layer: VOLTAGE. This layer consists of different sections of voltages, and no data traces
    Bottom Visible Layer: TRACES You can see this layer as well. It contains lots of traces too

    The unofficial nicknames for these layers are, respectively:
    Top Layer
    Gnd Layer
    Voltage Layer
    Bottom Layer

    Here is a rough scan of the voltage layer of a 40. (RVL-CPU-40)
    The voltage sections of the 60 and both RVK boards are similar to this, however, they differ slightly towards the front of the board where the sd card slot is. More details on this to come.
    [​IMG]
    Integrated Circuits
    As with any circuit board, the wii has quite a few integrated circuits, or ICs.

    CPU
    90nm CPU
    [​IMG]
    65nm CPU
    [​IMG]

    Reference Designator: U2 (top)
    Datasheet: Modified PPC 750CL
    Mandatory: Yes
    Solder Type: BGA

    The Wii's CPU, nicknamed "Broadway" is a stronger version of the gamecube's PowerPC Gecko. It is almost identical to the PowerPc 750CL. The older larger chips are made using a 90nm process while the newer smaller chips are made with the 65nm process. The chips use significantly less power. The Broadway is powered entirely by the 1.15v line.
    No datasheet is currently available for the Broadway, but here is the datasheet for the PowerPC , which is almost identical to the Broadway.

    GPU
    [​IMG]

    Reference Designator: U1 (top)
    Datasheet: Proprietary
    Mandatory: Yes
    Solder Type: BGA


    While the CPU is a slightly modified version of an off-the-shelf chip, the GPU, nicknamed Broadway, is a completely custom chip. It is unknown if the GPU was die shrunk along with the CPU, but removing the heat spreader of multiple chips shows that it has been reworked throughout the revisions. The chip also switched at some point to a slightly smaller footprint that uses slightly less rows of BGA solder balls. The gpu also contains the ARM coprocessor nicknamed "starlet" that handles new functionality of the wii such as USB. The Hollywood is powered by the 1v, 1.15v, 1.8v, and 3.3v lines.

    RAM

    Reference Designator: U3 (top)
    Datasheet: None
    Mandatory: Yes
    Solder Type: BGA


    Flash Memory
    [​IMG]

    Reference Designator: U14 (bottom)
    Datasheet: HY27UF082G2B
    Mandatory: Yes
    Solder Type: SMD
    -There are a few different manufacturers of this chip with different part numbers, but they all serve the same purpose

    MX Chip
    [​IMG]

    Reference Designator: U8 (top)
    Datasheet: Proprietary
    Mandatory: Yes
    Solder Type: SMD
    I have successfully transplanted MX Chips from one board to another, across revisions. Remember that the console will not boot if the thermistor detects that the board is still hot after the transplant, so wait for it to cool before testing.
    Pinout: http://wiibrew.org/wiki/MX23L4005


    Video Encoder
    Reference Designator: U6 (bottom)
    Datasheet: Proprietary
    Mandatory: Yes*
    Solder Type: SMD
    *in theory, the unit can be replaced with a new video encoder, however none exist as of now.

    Here is a diagram of the video encoder pins drawn up by none other than our lord Ashen himself
    [​IMG]

    Audio Amp
    [​IMG]

    Reference Designator: U7 (bottom)
    Datasheet: Proprietary
    Mandatory: No
    Solder Type: SMD
    -Runs on 12v line

    1.8v LDO
    [​IMG]

    Reference Designator: U4 (top)
    Datasheet: RT9009
    Mandatory: No
    Solder Type: 5 Pin SMD

    -Low dropout regulator
    -Powers the 1.8v line
    -Power Stats (For RVL-40)
    --Current is ~350 mA
    --Intakes 3.3v
    --Outputs 1.8v
    --Consumes ~.5w
    --Creates ~.5w of heat

    Voltage Comparator
    [​IMG]

    Reference Designator: U18 (top)
    Datasheet: LM2901
    Mandatory: No
    Solder Type: 14-pin SMD

    -Checks voltage lines, shuts down if anomaly is detected
    -Does not communicate with other chips, and can be removed

    Switch mode controllers
    [​IMG]

    Reference Designator: U15, U16, U17 (bottom)
    Datasheet: LV5052
    Mandatory: No
    Solder Type: 30 Pin SMD

    -Control 8 pin mosfet transistors on top of board.
    -Control regulation
    -There are different variations, all start with LV50.
    -Different ones have different resistor values
    -All resistors same ratio from board to board
    -Even same revisions have different LV chips

    Mysterious 5 pin ICs
    The purpose of these small 5 pin integrated circuits is still not fully understood.
    Here is what I believe the datasheet for U9 and U10 to be. It appears to be some voltage check that sends a 3.3v signal to the mx chip when the voltages of the 3.3v and 3.3v standby lines are at the correct voltage.

    Screen Shot 2016-03-23 at 10.11.36 PM.png

    U9 (not mandatory)
    Input voltage is the 3.3v standby line. Output is to a pin on the MX chip. 3 pins in a row connect to ground. This chip can be removed, but the data lines of the two non-grounded pins (Pin 4 and Pin 5) must be shorted for the console to boot.

    Pin 1: GND
    Pin 2: GND
    Pin 3: GND
    Pin 4: 3.3v standby
    Pin 5: Bluetooth Pin 14 + MX Pin 25

    If this chip is removed:
    Console WILL NOT BOOT if data lines of pins 4 and 5 are not shorted on startup
    Console WILL BOOT if data lines of pins 4 and 5 are shorted on startup.

    U10 (essentially mandatory)
    Behaves similarly to U9, with a few key differences. The console will not boot unless pins 4 and 5 are shorted AFTER power on. The pins must not be shorted when power is first applied, but must be shorted at least .1 seconds afterward.
    While the EXACT purpose of this chip is unknown, it is believed that this chip examines the 3.3v line, and sends a reset signal to the GPU and bluetooth board. This turns on both devices, and "re-calibrates" the 3.3v line.

    Pin 1: GND
    Pin 2: GND
    Pin 3: GND
    Pin 4: 3.3v
    Pin 5: MX Pin 24 + GPU

    If this chip is removed:
    Console WILL NOT BOOT if data lines of pins 4 and 5 are not shorted on startup
    Console WILL NOT BOOT if data lines of pins 4 and 5 are shorted on startup
    Console WILL BOOT if data lines of pin 4 and 5 are shorted AFTER STARTUP
    After bootup, data lines do not need to remain shorted.
    Reconnecting the line to 3.3v at any time while the console is powered on resets the console.

    If custom regulators are used, the console can boot without U10 under these conditions, but it causes issues.
    -1v and 1.15v MUST be powered before 3.3v power is applied.
    -pins 4 and 5 must be shorted
    In the current state, this is not recommended, and is only being mentioned for documentation purposes. 3.3v data lines such as the gamecube controller lines will act completely sporadic, because their reference voltage was not correctly set.

    U22 (not mandatory)
    Behaves similarly to U9 and U10, however it is wired in an interesting way. The chip has two ground pins, an activation pin, power in, and signal out. The output of this chip goes to the disc drive to tell it to eject. The activation pin (active when at ground) is always tied to ground, and the ground pins are brought high to disable the output (according to the datasheet, if the input voltage is not above a certain threshold, the chip will not activate, and when ground is brought up, essentially lowering the voltage the chip sees, it will deactivate).
    Transistors
    Aside from the 8 pin transistors used for power regulation, there are quite a few individual transistors on the wii. I don't know what any of them do at all. There are about 16 of them, and some cause problems when removed. I have yet to completely discover their purposes.

    Here is how I will be referring to the pins of the transistors:
    [​IMG]
    Q1: Fan power
    Pin 1:
    Pin 2: 5V
    Pin 3: Fan

    Q2: Disc Drive LED
    Pin 1: GPU (gate)
    Pin 2: GND
    Pin 3: Disc Drive slot LEDs

    Triggered by pin 2, which is controlled by the GPU. This transistor turns on and off the disc drive LED.

    Q4:

    Pin 2: GND

    Q5: Power LED
    Controls 1 Power LED Color
    Pin 1: MX Pin 2 (Gate)
    Pin 2: GND (Source)
    Pin 3: Power LED Cathode (Drain)

    Triggered by MX Pin 2. Shorts power LED cathode line to GND. Cathode (negative) line passes through R41 before connecting to transistor pin 3

    Q6:

    Pin 2: GND

    Q7: Japan Video Sense

    Pin 1: Video Encoder Pin 62
    Pin 2: GND
    Pin 3: AV out pin

    Q24: Sensor Bar

    Pin 1: GPU
    Pin 2: GND
    Pin 3: Sensor Bar Cathode

    Here is the list uses known so far. Keep in mind this info is unconfirmed
    -Sensor bar
    -Fan
    -Green LED
    -Red LED
    -Disc Drive LED
    -SD Card Sense Pin
    -Voltage Shutoff
    Resistors
    The following resistor values were removed and measured from the RVL-40 by JacksonS
    Capacitors
    The following capacitor values were removed and measured from the RVL-40 by JacksonS
    Pinout Diagrams
    AV, Power, Sensor Bar, GameCube Controller, and USB
    [​IMG]
    (full size image link)

    Goals to add:
    Gamecube Memory Card Pinout
    SD Card Pinout
    Disc Drive Pinout
    Face Buttons Pinout
    Clock Battery Pinout
    The Compendium
    Download Link Coming Soon
    Paint.net is a free software required to view this file. Unfortunately, it is only available for Windows
    Download link for Paint.net
    Prepare your anus, because this is huge. The compendium is a massive undertaking by Shank, with the help of Gman and Shockslayer. The goal: document the wii circuit board. All of it. In this Paint.net file, layers and layers of translucent drawings are placed on top of another. Selecting the one you want to view and your desired board layer allows you to see where almost every connection on the board comes from and goes, and what each trace does. It is useful for getting detailed information on the board, troubleshooting, and pioneering new cuts. The file takes up quite a bit of ram.

    The Compendium is an ever-unfinished and living project. It is constantly being updated, and more info is always being added. The provided link will always be the most up-to-date version.
    Recommendations for Storage
    Both of these flash drives have been confirmed to work with portablizemii. They are small, inexpensive, and have storage up to 128gb.
    Lexar
    Samsung
    Wii Mini
    HAS NOT FULLY BEEN HACKED (yet)
    Here are some fun facts about the wii mini:
    Disc Drive
    -Top loading
    -Uses different connector than the wii
    -Drive swap capability has not been tested.
    -Uses a plug connecter rather than an FFC
    I/O
    -No gamecube ports or solder pads
    -No SD card or Solder Pads for a slot, but DOES contain test pads and circuitry
    -No wifi card connector, but DOES have solder pads and circuitry for one
    -No component video lines or capacitors
    -Only has 1 USB port compared to wii's dual ports
    -Uses same/similar Bluetooth module, but has a slightly different connector
    Other Info
    -Uses much smaller fan and heat sink system
    -Uses NO proprietary or triwing screws
    -Board layout is very similar to the other 4 layer wii boards
    -Does not have a 3.3v standby, all components are connected to 3.3v instead
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2016
    Chaos, LitOdyssey, Miceeno and 2 others like this.

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