Discussion Ideas, questions, etc, Post em here!

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I want to portablize a steam link or a raspberry pi 3 for under $200 I tried listing my project off of the gamepi3 by araymbox on thingiverse https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3488841
but the 3d printing on the shell alone costs about $100
I want to be able to try to make a raspberry pi 3 handheld or a steam link handheld (both which I already own) without feeling like I'm putting a huge part of my biweekly paycheck into it... I don't want to pay over $200 to realize that I have fudged up and can't reverse my work and have something unusable in the end
 
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I am very new to making portables or anything electronic related, could someone tell me where I can learn about all this stuff?
Also for my first project I want to make a portable wii, is this a good idea or is a portable wii too complicated to make?
 
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Yo I'm new to electronics in general and haven't used a soldering iron since my metals class in middle school, was wondering where a good place to start would be for making portables. I'll definitely be doing some other electronics projects before hand so I can become a little more well versed in the soldering department and get more comfortable with working on electronics in general.
 

jefflongo

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Yo I'm new to electronics in general and haven't used a soldering iron since my metals class in middle school, was wondering where a good place to start would be for making portables. I'll definitely be doing some other electronics projects before hand so I can become a little more well versed in the soldering department and get more comfortable with working on electronics in general.
First, you want to make sure you have a quality iron. One that has a station with temperature control, and hopefully from a reputable brand like Hakko or Weller. Second, you want some good solder. Generally thinner is better, I tend to like Kester 63 37. Third, absolutely pick up some flux. I'm partial to Kester 951 liquid flux. It also helps to have a variety of wire such as 22awg, 26awg, 30awg stranded, and some 34awg magnet wire. tools, it makes the job a lot easier. I would then probably practice by soldering wires to parts of the board, desoldering parts, etc. You can use junk PCBs on broken things for practice.
 
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First, you want to make sure you have a quality iron. One that has a station with temperature control, and hopefully from a reputable brand like Hakko or Weller. Second, you want some good solder. Generally thinner is better, I tend to like Kester 63 37. Third, absolutely pick up some flux. I'm partial to Kester 951 liquid flux. It also helps to have a variety of wire such as 22awg, 26awg, 30awg stranded, and some 34awg magnet wire. tools, it makes the job a lot easier. I would then probably practice by soldering wires to parts of the board, desoldering parts, etc. You can use junk PCBs on broken things for practice.
I for sure won't skimp out on a soldering Iron I'm going for the Hakko fx-888d. As for the solder I had no Idea so thanks a bunch I'll add that to the list along with the flux! is there anything else you would recommend grabbing? I've got a few things in mind but thanks for the reply!
 

jefflongo

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I for sure won't skimp out on a soldering Iron I'm going for the Hakko fx-888d. As for the solder I had no Idea so thanks a bunch I'll add that to the list along with the flux! is there anything else you would recommend grabbing? I've got a few things in mind but thanks for the reply!
Some desoldering braid could be useful, also helps to have 90% or higher IPA for cleaning flux residue off. I also own an FX-888d (best iron in it's class imo) and the stock tip works great for pretty much everything. If you really plan to invest in equipment for assembling your own PCBs or advanced repairs/mods you might consider picking up an 858d hot air station clone from eBay for about 40 bucks. Absolutely worth it if you plan to do more than just build a portable.
 
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Some desoldering braid could be useful, also helps to have 90% or higher IPA for cleaning flux residue off. I also own an FX-888d (best iron in it's class imo) and the stock tip works great for pretty much everything. If you really plan to invest in equipment for assembling your own PCBs or advanced repairs/mods you might consider picking up an 858d hot air station clone from eBay for about 40 bucks. Absolutely worth it if you plan to do more than just build a portable.
awesome thank you so much for all the help I appreciate it! I'm glad I started saving a little each paycheck cause I'm gonna need it. Hopefully I can start a work log on here by spring, but thanks again I appreciate the help!
 
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I for sure won't skimp out on a soldering Iron I'm going for the Hakko fx-888d. As for the solder I had no Idea so thanks a bunch I'll add that to the list along with the flux! is there anything else you would recommend grabbing? I've got a few things in mind but thanks for the reply!
Some desoldering braid could be useful, also helps to have 90% or higher IPA for cleaning flux residue off. I also own an FX-888d (best iron in it's class imo) and the stock tip works great for pretty much everything. If you really plan to invest in equipment for assembling your own PCBs or advanced repairs/mods you might consider picking up an 858d hot air station clone from eBay for about 40 bucks. Absolutely worth it if you plan to do more than just build a portable.
Just a heads up, the FX-888d is pretty annoying to set the temperature because they only give you two buttons. The original FX-888 simply has a knob which makes it easier, but you lack a digital temperature readout. I've used both and I prefer the original FX-888 for quick temp switching. You might be able to find a used one on ebay for cheaper.

Also, with those knockoff FX-858d hot air stations, often times they are wired up in extremely sketchy ways. I have a friend who had one and it burned out within a week. There are videos online showing the fuse being improperly wired (literally bypassing the fuse) and various other hazards like the manufacturer not clipping the excess length of the through-hole leads which could cause a short. One user on EEVblog had an Atten 858d with the exposed metal wired to live 120V AC, so please just use one with caution. In my opinion, I'd still get one but please be aware of these issues. I'd recommend checking the resistance of the ground on the plug to any exposed metal on the unit to ensure you won't get shocked.
 

jefflongo

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Just a heads up, the FX-888d is pretty annoying to set the temperature because they only give you two buttons. The original FX-888 simply has a knob which makes it easier, but you lack a digital temperature readout. I've used both and I prefer the original FX-888 for quick temp switching. You might be able to find a used one on ebay for cheaper.

Also, with those knockoff FX-858d hot air stations, often times they are wired up in extremely sketchy ways. I have a friend who had one and it burned out within a week. There are videos online showing the fuse being improperly wired (literally bypassing the fuse) and various other hazards like the manufacturer not clipping the excess length of the through-hole leads which could cause a short. One user on EEVblog had an Atten 858d with the exposed metal wired to live 120V AC, so please just use one with caution. In my opinion, I'd still get one but please be aware of these issues. I'd recommend checking the resistance of the ground on the plug to any exposed metal on the unit to ensure you won't get shocked.
When I bought mine, I bought one on Amazon with good reviews. I also took it apart and checked the mains wiring to be sure it's safe. Probably not a bad idea to do.
 
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Just a heads up, the FX-888d is pretty annoying to set the temperature because they only give you two buttons. The original FX-888 simply has a knob which makes it easier, but you lack a digital temperature readout. I've used both and I prefer the original FX-888 for quick temp switching. You might be able to find a used one on ebay for cheaper.

Also, with those knockoff FX-858d hot air stations, often times they are wired up in extremely sketchy ways. I have a friend who had one and it burned out within a week. There are videos online showing the fuse being improperly wired (literally bypassing the fuse) and various other hazards like the manufacturer not clipping the excess length of the through-hole leads which could cause a short. One user on EEVblog had an Atten 858d with the exposed metal wired to live 120V AC, so please just use one with caution. In my opinion, I'd still get one but please be aware of these issues. I'd recommend checking the resistance of the ground on the plug to any exposed metal on the unit to ensure you won't get shocked.
Oof if that's the case then I'll try to be a bit more careful, thanks a bunch for the important info. Hopefully I won't end up with any problems but you can never be too cautious I guess. And between the two versions of the FX-888 I'm not sure what I'll go with but I don't think I'd hate not having the digital temperature readout.
 

jefflongo

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My old station had a temperature dial and while it was nice to have, I only alternate between a few temperatures which the Hakko can do at a push of the button. The only annoying thing IMO is that it's very easy to accidentally clear the preset calibration.
 
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My old station had a temperature dial and while it was nice to have, I only alternate between a few temperatures which the Hakko can do at a push of the button. The only annoying thing IMO is that it's very easy to accidentally clear the preset calibration.
Oh I didn't know you were able to set up presets that actually sounds pretty nifty. I'll probably do a little more research before choosing then cause I'm sure there will be ups and downs no matter what I choose. thanks again!
 

Kae

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So I am new to electronic stuff in general and I don't really know if this is the right place but I tried searching and didn't find anything that really fit what I needed. I have one of those display model 3ds that doesn't work unless it is plugged in. I would like to mod it so that it can use the battery but I have no idea how to go about that.
 
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I am wanting to build a Wii portable. I learned about portablizing when one of @Shank ’s videos was recommended on YouTube. I have experience working with electronics and with soldering, but not really working with consoles. I am planning on using some of the stuff of the BitBuilt store; the GC+ board, the U-AMP board, and the PMS if it becomes available for purchase again soon. I was wondering, after you’ve connected your buttons, joysticks, etc., to the GC+, how do you connect that to a trimmed Wii? I am using the OMGWTF trim, if that makes any difference.

Edit: I want to specify that I don’t yet have everything, I am just looking for info so that I can get to work once I do have what I need. I am looking more of a general “how do I connect the GC+ to my Wii” kind of thing.
 
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StonedEdge

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I was wondering, after you’ve connected your buttons, joysticks, etc., to the GC+, how do you connect that to a trimmed Wii? I am using the OMGWTF trim, if that makes any difference.
You connect the data line “D” to the P1 controller data line on the Wii motherboard specified in the trimming guide. Buttons are then wired from each pad on the board. Each button has to have a ground as well.
 

cheese

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They were recently in stock, but they sold out. Noah says there will be more in stock next month. If you join the discord we have a channel for bb store announcements.
 
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I am well on my way to making a parts list or a Wii portable, I just have a couple things I’m stuck on. I’d like a screen, probably 5”, and I need batteries, preferably Li-Po due to their small size. Both of those, I’m just having trouble finding what I need. However, as far as speakers go, I don’t even know where to start. I’ve also noticed some people having vga to hdmi adapters and I was wondering what that is for and if it was necessary. If anyone could help out with any of this that’d be great. Thanks!

Edit: I suppose I should mention that I’m not just trying to get someone else to find these parts for me so I don’t have to. I just don’t know what I’m doing or what I’m looking for. Even just some kind of explanation as to what is important and what to look for as far as these parts go would be appreciated, for example what kind of screen to look for or something like that.
 
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Shidi

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So I'm fairly new to portable's and other electronics as I always had an intrest in them but never knew how to do anything, I recently learnt how to solder and I was wondering about things such as average price of making a portable (more specificly wii) what tools to use that sort of thing, if anyone could help out it would be very much appreciated.
 
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So I'm fairly new to portable's and other electronics as I always had an intrest in them but never knew how to do anything, I recently learnt how to solder and I was wondering about things such as average price of making a portable (more specificly wii) what tools to use that sort of thing, if anyone could help out it would be very much appreciated.
I'm also new to this, and I haven't actually made a portable yet, but so far, I've found it really helpful to look on the forum to try and find other people's parts lists, as well as some of the other questions that people have asked that may answer some of your own. I would suggest even just going to the search bar and searching "parts list". That should at least get you started in finding out what you'll need.
 
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