Solved Which Case method is better?

3D Print or Vacuum forming = best


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It looks like it'll be a decent printer, but it is a bit small if you want it for cases.
That's what I thought then I looked at the pictures and thought idk maybe I could make it vertically or something I'm not sure though can you recommend some then?
 

cheese

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That's what I thought then I looked at the pictures and thought idk maybe I could make it vertically or something I'm not sure though can you recommend some then?
Don't try to make a case vertically, besides the fact that it has the same vertical height as horizontal, a case will be extremely weak if printed on it's side.

I haven't bought a printer for a few years, but I'm sure @Gman or @Chaos would be able to make a suggestion.
 
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Original Prusa i3 MK2 is the best printer you can get without spending over $2k. It is the only printer I truly trust. @Chaos and @Downing both bought one too and I think they would agree. http://shop.prusa3d.com/en/3d-printers/59-original-prusa-i3-mk2-kit.html
Alright so from my understanding with a 3d printer I would first for example with a gamecube trim the mother board blah blah blah and would be able to make a case just from the printer and put the tech inside the 3d printed case and everythings all good right?
 

Gman

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Alright so from my understanding with a 3d printer I would first for example with a gamecube trim the mother board blah blah blah and would be able to make a case just from the printer and put the tech inside the 3d printed case and everythings all good right?
Well you will have to design the case using a CAD software first
 
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Well you will have to design the case using a CAD software first
Yes after you have the file and it comes out in different parts and you sand it and trim anything if needed you would just put in the motherboard and stuff in right?
 
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is it like a headache to put together or something?
From what I've seen on these forums, pretty much. They can sometimes self-destruct (I don't mean blow-up), they get hotter, use more energy, and many of the mod chips to play games without using a disc drive don't exist. But my "uh oh" was from the fact that a certain member will argue wii > gamecube till he dies, and its become sort of a running joke among us. See this for more info.
 

Matthew

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Like Gman was saying the Prusa i3 MK2 (or MK2S as I believe it is now) is hands down the best bang for your buck when it comes to 3D Printing. It has the most features without all of the headaches and annoyances that other printers have without having to spend $2000 dollars.

Case design is an art and a sometimes tricky one at that. While frankencasing is a timeless classic and is in many instances a viable option, 3D printing and other CNC-type of design has pretty much become the norm and for good reason. It's much easier to fix a computer design and reprint it then start over if you mess up while frakencasing.

Yes after you have the file and it comes out in different parts and you sand it and trim anything if needed you would just put in the motherboard and stuff in right?
It sounds like you are a bit confused on what a case is. It's probably better to call it an enclosure than a case. Yes you design it and print it out, but you want to design it AROUND the parts and motherboard that you are using. Not the other way around. You don't first design a case, then hope all of your parts fit inside.

So yes you print it off and make the case look pretty and then put the parts inside of it. If you are lacking access to a 3D printer, make your design and contact me. I have a 3D printing service that is available if needed.
 
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Like Gman was saying the Prusa i3 MK2 (or MK2S as I believe it is now) is hands down the best bang for your buck when it comes to 3D Printing. It has the most features without all of the headaches and annoyances that other printers have without having to spend $2000 dollars.

Case design is an art and a sometimes tricky one at that. While frankencasing is a timeless classic and is in many instances a viable option, 3D printing and other CNC-type of design has pretty much become the norm and for good reason. It's much easier to fix a computer design and reprint it then start over if you mess up while frakencasing.



It sounds like you are a bit confused on what a case is. It's probably better to call it an enclosure than a case. Yes you design it and print it out, but you want to design it AROUND the parts and motherboard that you are using. Not the other way around. You don't first design a case, then hope all of your parts fit inside.

So yes you print it off and make the case look pretty and then put the parts inside of it. If you are lacking access to a 3D printer, make your design and contact me. I have a 3D printing service that is available if needed.
Alrighty thanks so much for the information lets see how far I get in portabalizing. I'm buying a work bench (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B019K7O5FY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_mRdSzbRE46AX1) along with a bunch of the necessary tools like a soldering station and what not. Thanks again to all
 

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Marked as solved. Good luck!
 
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3d printer but if you want case that looks cool somwhere its shiny its better to ask some people in china that making replicas bcs they know how to make it shiny or like1 material bcs 3d printer have the layers that are visible and it dont look very good but for testing and prototyping its great i have creality cr 10
 

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wanhao 3d printer i3

This is to be a Prusa based printer by some Chinese company.
Here's the funny part, it's supposed be of good quality!
 
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Vacuum forming had it's place back in the day when I first started. It was great if you wanted a custom design and then could Frankencase the components into it. Then when CNC came along, that combined with Vacuum forming was an amazing tool and allowed for exterior finish quality that even to this day is hard to beat with 3D printing....but, FDM 3D printing allowed to work from the inside out and though there was a learning curve for the CAD portion that was necessary, the actual "engineering" of a portable was possible. So at the expense of more finishing work, which really you had to do anyway with you were Frankencasing, you could have a fully structured portable casing which was custom to the design you were creating.

Then SLA 3D printing came into the picture, which though extremely expensive and impractical for this hobby on the whole, it brought the precision of using components that were usually ripped from other parts like controllers to be used in the same fashion that FDM was with the casing itself. So now being able to design components with a stock finish quality, specific to the project you're working on has been another huge improvement to case/component design.

Let's not forget too that 3D printing also allows for the more precise use of custom PCBs, another integral part in producing high quality portable systems. And though I haven't tried it yet, but it is on the to-do list in the very near future, SLA provides the ability to print in different materials like rubber, and the next venture is to start making my own rubber contact pads so I won't have to use tact switches anymore to really give the authentic feel of an original controller. TL9000 (rubber tipped) tact switches have been the go-to for years, but even those may soon be replaced due to 3D printing.

Very exciting stuff ahead and it is no doubt way ahead of vacuum forming on nearly every level. I would invest in the future if you're going to get started in this and as @Gman said, the Prusa i3 MK2 is the best bang for the buck to get started!
 
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