Question Want to get into portablizing. I have several questions.

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To start off, I've read through these threads to get an idea of the work I'm getting myself into

https://bitbuilt.net/forums/index.php?threads/wii-motherboard-anatomy-101.2229/
https://bitbuilt.net/forums/index.php?threads/revision-identification-guide.863/
https://bitbuilt.net/forums/index.php?threads/the-definitive-wii-trimming-guide.198/
https://bitbuilt.net/forums/index.php?threads/custom-regulators-an-explanation-and-guide.754/
https://bitbuilt.net/forums/index.p...ve-wii-trimming-and-troubleshooting-faq.2385/

I've been interested in making a portable Wii for quite a while now (since I saw the KillMii by Shank). Now I think I have the patience and funds to give it a couple tries (I say a couple because I guarantee I'll heck something up the first time). Since I'm a frickin noob, I figured I would ask some questions I have.

- How do I interpret the relocation images from the trimming guide? Here's an example


(sorry the images are big)
This is apparently how to relocate the bluetooth module from where it is by default onto the trim. I can see where the module is and how pins 10 and 11 need to be connected... somewhere near the GPU, but where exactly is that? Where do I place the actual module when I'm done? Does it matter which 3.3v source pins 6, 7, and 13 are connected to? I can almost interpret everything but I need to make sure I do it right.

-Where should I buy custom regulators? From what I can tell, I need 4 (a 1v, 1.15v, a 3.3v, and a [technically optional] 5v all of the PTH08080 model). Is there a preferred place to order from or do I just fend for myself there? That's also another diagram I don't understand. Are the regulators pictured all custom ones or are they ones that have to be replaced? Do I replace them to the same spots I remove them from?

-When I'm relocating a module, where do I put it if I attach it with wires. Do I just tape it down somewhere and call it a day?

-How would I attach built in controls to my portable? I can't seem to find a guide for that anywhere

-Where do I put the battery and what battery should I buy?

-Is there any video guide of someone building any kind of Wii portable from the ground up that I can use as a reference?

-What speakers would you recommend?

-Why do I see online that it can cost around $300 to make one of these? I'm willing to put forth the cash but I can pick up a wii for $10, a good screen for $50, a case for cheap, etc. What other parts do I need that would raise the cost so much?


I'm sure I have a billion more questions but that's all I can think of as a baseline. Even if you only have the time to answer one or two of these that would be awesome. Thanks a lot for help in advance!
 

Noah

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Great job reading the guides before asking questions. It shows you’re willing to try things yourself before immediately giving up and asking for a lifeline which we really appreciate around here. I’ll answer all of your questions as best I can.

This is apparently how to relocate the bluetooth module from where it is by default onto the trim. I can see where the module is and how pins 10 and 11 need to be connected... somewhere near the GPU, but where exactly is that? Where do I place the actual module when I'm done? Does it matter which 3.3v source pins 6, 7, and 13 are connected to? I can almost interpret everything but I need to make sure I do it right.
So the BT module doesn’t have any good points on the board to connect it to once it’s trimmed. The pins 10 and 11 are both data + and - since I’m pretty sure it’s just USB. Since there are no good points, our only option is to scratch the traces with a razor blade or fiberglass pencil in order to expose the copper underneath and solder to that. Various worklogs will have good examples of it being done.

It doesn’t matter which 3.3V source you use for the module since on the Wii they’re all internally connected. If you use a multimeter and check for continuity between every 3.3V pin on the Wii you’ll find they’re all connected so it does not matter.

And finally, to mount the module normally I’ll use a little dab of hot glue and mount it on the back of the motherboard (since in almost every portable the Wii is mounted backside up) and then wire it after the fact. Just make sure it’s not directly above the CPU, GPU, or RAM as those get hot enough to melt the glue.

-Where should I buy custom regulators? From what I can tell, I need 4 (a 1v, 1.15v, a 3.3v, and a [technically optional] 5v all of the PTH08080 model). Is there a preferred place to order from or do I just fend for myself there? That's also another diagram I don't understand. Are the regulators pictured all custom ones or are they ones that have to be replaced? Do I replace them to the same spots I remove them from?
It’s been a long time since I’ve ordered PTH regs and to be honest you’d be much better off getting a Wii PMS from our store over at https://store.bitbuilt.net because they are far, far more “noob friendly” than making your own custom regulators and charging solution. For example, you’d need to buy the regulators, a battery charging board, and figure something out for a power on/off switch if you used PTH regs. The Wii PMS does all of that for you and handles the regulators, charging, and lets you easily use a tactile switch that you hold for a couple seconds to power the portable on and off. It’s truly the superior option and costs just about the same when all is said and done.

-When I'm relocating a module, where do I put it if I attach it with wires. Do I just tape it down somewhere and call it a day?
Hot glue or adheseive is usually best for mounting modules onto the Wii motherboard. If it's wired to the Wii then I like to attach it to the board as well so that the Wii itself can be removed as one single unit should issues arise without having to disconnect a bunch of relocated things.

-How would I attach built in controls to my portable? I can't seem to find a guide for that anywhere
Most people use a GC+, a microcontroller on a PCB that emulates a GameCube controller. (Can also be bought on the store.) Then, most people will use what we refer to as "squishy tacts" because they feel about as close to the original membrane pads that ship in OEM controllers as we can get without actually using said membrane pads, which is also an option.
http://www.kestparts.com/alps-tact-switch-200-pcs-pack-snap-action-switch-new/

-Where do I put the battery and what battery should I buy?
If you get a PMS as per my earlier recommendation most people use 18650 cells with them. These would work best, either get 2 or 4 depending on how big your portable is going to be and how many you can/want to fit inside.
https://mabdelectronics.com/collect...0mah-high-drain-flat-top-rechargeable-battery
 

Noah

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-Is there any video guide of someone building any kind of Wii portable from the ground up that I can use as a reference?
Unfortunately each build is unique so there will most likely never be a step by step guide for building a portable, at least not in the fashion I know most people would like to see. Things change far too quickly in this hobby for us to be able to keep on top of keeping something like that up to date. However, there are several streams on the BitBuilt YouTube channel of assemblies of various types of Wii portables, so those would be a good reference to look over. I try to talk my way thought the process as best I can as I go along in them, so hopefully some of the information is useful.

-What speakers would you recommend?
Get a U-AMP from the store and pair it with these speakers to have the best audio experience.
https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/cui-devices/CMS-15116-SP/102-4356-ND/7605033

-Why do I see online that it can cost around $300 to make one of these? I'm willing to put forth the cash but I can pick up a wii for $10, a good screen for $50, a case for cheap, etc. What other parts do I need that would raise the cost so much?
Wiis are the cheapest part of a portable. There are a lot of smaller parts that add up without you even realizing. When all is said and done, I can normally build one for $150 or so depending on the model itself and what parts are required, but I've been doing this for 10+ years and have a lot of experience under my belt. That being said, I still on occasion kill components and have to replace things, albeit at a much lower frequency than someone who is new to the hobby would, but dead components you need to replace also tick the cost counter up. Off of the top of my head you need batteries (2x or 4x), a screen, a Wii, a case, power management circuitry, buttons, a controller, an audio amp, speakers, a flash drive and much much more. As I said, there are a lot of parts required and those are only a fraction! So it's not as cheap as it seems, but it's also very possible to spend $300 on a first build if you aren't already skilled with soldering and the like.

Hopefully that answers most of your questions!
 
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Unfortunately each build is unique so there will most likely never be a step by step guide for building a portable, at least not in the fashion I know most people would like to see. Things change far too quickly in this hobby for us to be able to keep on top of keeping something like that up to date. However, there are several streams on the BitBuilt YouTube channel of assemblies of various types of Wii portables, so those would be a good reference to look over. I try to talk my way thought the process as best I can as I go along in them, so hopefully some of the information is useful.


Get a U-AMP from the store and pair it with these speakers to have the best audio experience.
https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/cui-devices/CMS-15116-SP/102-4356-ND/7605033


Wiis are the cheapest part of a portable. There are a lot of smaller parts that add up without you even realizing. When all is said and done, I can normally build one for $150 or so depending on the model itself and what parts are required, but I've been doing this for 10+ years and have a lot of experience under my belt. That being said, I still on occasion kill components and have to replace things, albeit at a much lower frequency than someone who is new to the hobby would, but dead components you need to replace also tick the cost counter up. Off of the top of my head you need batteries (2x or 4x), a screen, a Wii, a case, power management circuitry, buttons, a controller, an audio amp, speakers, a flash drive and much much more. As I said, there are a lot of parts required and those are only a fraction! So it's not as cheap as it seems, but it's also very possible to spend $300 on a first build if you aren't already skilled with soldering and the like.

Hopefully that answers most of your questions!
Wow. That was so much more help than I ever expected. Thanks a lot! Since I've been wandering this forum and it's obvious that you have an idea about what you're doing, what would you say are some of the easiest ways to screw up your project beyond repair? Obviously you could trim the Wii wrong but apart from that what should I look out for?

I probably shouldn't admit this but I've never done any hardware modding at all. Most people say not to start with something so complicated but my stubborn part won't listen to them.
 

Noah

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Wow. That was so much more help than I ever expected. Thanks a lot! Since I've been wandering this forum and it's obvious that you have an idea about what you're doing, what would you say are some of the easiest ways to screw up your project beyond repair? Obviously you could trim the Wii wrong but apart from that what should I look out for?

I probably shouldn't admit this but I've never done any hardware modding at all. Most people say not to start with something so complicated but my stubborn part won't listen to them.
I had never done any hardware modding when I embarked on my first portable project either. Granted, it did take me like 2 years to finish it lol, but nowadays things are a bit simpler than they were back then. As long as you're persistent you'll be able to make one.

Honestly the thing that people seem to underestimate most is how careful you need to be when working with electronics in general. Forgetting something is powered on when soldering to it can be quite detrimental or accidentally shorting something could kill your entire project. Keeping a steady hand and not rushing to do anything is what most people tend to take issue with. We live in a "right here right now" kind of world now and people expect things to happen quickly and almost instantaneously, but gathering the parts to build a portable for example can take a few weeks on its own, not to mention putting everything together.

and it's obvious that you have an idea about what you're doing
I manage the website along with the rest of the staff, so I'd hope so! :P
 
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If I were to get the 18650 batteries, how would I install those into a portable, specifically a portable with a PMS board?
 

cheese

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If I were to get the 18650 batteries, how would I install those into a portable, specifically a portable with a PMS board?
Depends, do you mean how to keep it in the case or how to connect it to the PMS?
For keeping it in the case, I'd use either kapton tape or a tiny dab of hot glue.
For wiring, specifically for the PMS you need to wire it in parallel, 2 cells would connect both positives together, and connect that to the B+, and connect both negatives together, and connect that to GND. For more cells, just continue connecting together all positive to B+ and negative to GND.
 
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I guess what I mean is, is it safe to just solder wires directly onto the ends of the batteries? Or is there some other way that I should attach the batteries to the PMS?
 

StonedEdge

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I guess what I mean is, is it safe to just solder wires directly onto the ends of the batteries? Or is there some other way that I should attach the batteries to the PMS?
You can use 18650 battery holders if you have them. Can get them from Amazon. Otherwise soldering to the batteries is the only other option really.
 

Stitches

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If you use a bit of 400 grit sandpaper to make a rough spot on the battery terminals and keep the heat on them for only a short time, you can pretty safely solder to the batteries. The easier way would be to get cells with tabs. Some vendors stock tabbed cells and they're just like normal cells, but have a thin flat metal tab welded onto the terminals. The tabs can be cut to suit the length you want and soldering to them is much easier.
 
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