Worklog Controller Chip CNT-NUS eagle library and custom board with controller pak

Discussion in 'Nintendo 64' started by Luis Mendonça, May 30, 2019.

  1. Luis Mendonça .

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    Hi everyone! I'm finishing a library for the controller chip, so I can make a custom board using it, for me at least it will be very useful, if anyone is interested, I may upload it here.

    It's not hard to do, I know, but it's boring, takes some hours of our days lol.

    CNT-NUS_proto.png
    20190530_112208.jpg
    20190530_112156.jpg

    Of course I still have to test it on a printed board to see if the pads are really alligned, but they do seem in place.
    I'm using as a reference the controller pinout from here.
    I intend on doing a smaller board, and pinout for the controller pak I modded to not use batteries. Do you guys think it's worth it?

    Edit 1:

    Since I plan on making the custom board, I mapped the controller pak as in the image:
    Controller_pak_modified.jpg

    Pins are as follow.:

    1 = E2
    2 = E3
    3 = E4
    4 = E5
    5 = Battery? Have to test more
    6 = E7
    7 = E8
    8 = E9
    9 = E10
    10 = E11
    11 = E12
    12 = E13
    13 = E16
    14 = GND
    15 = E32
    16 = E30
    17 = E29
    18 = E28
    19 = E27
    20 = N/C
    21 = E26
    22 = E25
    23 = E24
    24 = E23
    25 = E22
    26 = E21
    27 = E20
    28 = Seems to be VCC

    The U1 chip, named PWIC, seems to be a step down, but I didn't find anything about it online yet, 99% sure it's just a converter.
    The bigger white box named C1 connects to pin 31/15 VCC, and to ground. Not sure if any of those are necessary to function, or if the chip can work on it's own, when connected to the E-pins.
    As far as I can tell, the FM28V020 works by putting it in place, that's what I tested. By it's datasheet, pin 28 really is VCC and it works off of 2,0 to 3,6 V, and should be 3,3V.

    The datasheet also says.:
    "A 0.1uF decoupling capacitor should be placed close to pin 28 (VDD) and the ground side of the capacitor should be connected to either a ground plane or low impedance path back to pin 14 (VSS). It is best to use a chip capacitor that has low ESR and has good high frequency characteristics."

    Edit 2:

    So I will make/have someone to make this board, here it's a picture of it, if it works I will share here the board layout + the libraries I made for the project (The cap I will use is not ideal on the memory chip, but here it's hoping lol).

    N64_controller_plus_pak.png

    The buttons placement is a mess, didn't have much time to organize that, the board can probably be made smaller, but I'm not particularly good at this board designing thing.
    I could share the groundings, I could make the analog connections pins instead of pads... And a lot of other improvements.
    Anyway let's see if it works...

    Edit 3:


    So, while I wait for MONTHS, for the board to arrive in my country, I will list a few things here for a next revision of this board:

    • Integrate the board with the analog solution for the N64 (Analog stick, micro controller etc)
    • Redo (remove) the many ground pads, which are unecessary space on the board DONE
    • Release the files on my github page
    • Release a bonus design which I'll use on my own portable, integrating all the buttons, aswell as the analog sticks in one board, ready to be placed on case.
    • Add also the rumble functionality aswell as the already present on the board controller pak, but since I don't have those clone paks that have this functionality, I won't do this for now. But will be a nice feature.[/S]


    Here it's a picture of the new board design, without the unecessary ground pads.
    N64_controller_plus_pak.png
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2019
    mknrls, Stitches and Reverand_Cletus like this.

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