Worklog Chunchunmaru - A PS2 Portable

AFE123

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To remove those ports I’ve used side cutters they work but just go easy on it to not damage anything. Start on the top side and first remove the metal shield then start cutting away the pins.
How would you recommend removing this chip? Is a hotair station the only option?
1654112220568.png
 

AFE123

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I utilized the advice @Customledmods gave to me, and used brute force to remove the ports. For the controller and memory card ports, I'm sure I can get away with using a good ol solder sucker to take it off. I want to salvage it because I want to implement the ports instead of having an internal card. It might ruin the appearance, but I want to make it easy enough to troubleshoot. The controller ports will go onto the dock I've been talking about.
1654113180654.png


I haven't been able to work on this project since I'm busy studying for the PAR exam. In addition, I have a summer class and potentially a job.

On another note, I'm delaying doing any addition soldering, because I haven't been feeling well. After soldering, I get massive headaches, and I overall don't feel good. To deal with this, I'm going to design and create a fume extractor with 4 4200 RPM fans and a fume filter. I'll probably make another worklog for the extractor, and make the print files open source (if anyone's interested).
 
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You can remove the pins by applying heat to the top pads, melting the solder for a bit, and gently pulling on the pins until they come out. You'll want something to hold the regulator in place while you do that. A small PCB vise or third hand station would do. You can make it easier by adding leaded solder to the pads, it'll mix in with the existing lead free solder and lower the melting temp. Just helps speed the process up a bit.

As for the resistors, I used to do it like this
View attachment 22690
There are better ways to do it, but I ran the resistor over the top of the ceramic cap with a bit of electrical tape and soldered the capacitors to the underside of the pads. That way I didn't have to compete with anything to get the wires soldered on. Also it's not really shown in the photo, but I used pliers to create a little right angle at the end of the capacitor legs and pressed the legs up into the pad for a bit of extra hold.
about custom regulators, have you heard of the mini 560? he is good ? I've seen videos on YouTube and it works too
 

AFE123

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how are you going to cut it, I would take it off with a soldering iron, using chip saver
I'm using a rotary tool with a diamond tip on it. I do have access to a hot air station, so I'll try using that first. Thanks for the advice, but what's chip saver?
about custom regulators, have you heard of the mini 560? he is good ? I've seen videos on YouTube and it works too
I'm sure there are other good options, but PTH regulators were the most common before the PMS came to be. I already have the regulators, so I don't have to worry about it.
 
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I'm using a rotary tool with a diamond tip on it. I do have access to a hot air station, so I'll try using that first. Thanks for the advice, but what's chip saver?
and a solder that melts at low temperature, mixes with normal solder, and because it is low temperature to melt, the chip comes off easily with a soldering iron

I'm sure there are other good options, but PTH regulators were the most common before the PMS came to be. I already have the regulators, so I don't have to worry about it.
 
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this method does not harm the board, more chance of not damaging it when removing components
 

AFE123

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6/8/22

I’ve finally done it. I trimmed the motherboard. To be honest, it was scary. My primary concern wasn’t ruining the motherboard, but my health and safety was a concern. It’s not worth getting cancer. I made sure to trim outside, wear protective eyewear, a KN-95 mask and gloves. Trimming the board itself was smooth sailing. My rotary tool did bounce a couple of times, but I don’t think (hopefully) I messed anything up.

I left myself some margin by not cutting at the line. I’m not sure if it’s necessary to sand it all the way to the line, so kindly let me know. I used 600, then 800, then 1000 on the motherboard when sanding, and it’s smooth like butter. Should I use 1200 grit or am I fine at 1000? I check the resistance of each point with a multimeter and got the following:



The lines not labeled, I had trouble measuring the voltages. I either couldn’t get a reading, no matter where I place the prongs, or possible made a mistake.

Instead of scratching traces in these areas, can I just solder the respective power lines to these points?

one more thing,


1654722146229.png

Should I be concerned about these scratches? It seems to be a superficial scratch, only affecting the mask.

Edit: The guide tells you where you can solder. I wasn't comfortable soldering to the scrapes I made, so I used some solder points highlighted in the guide.
 
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you have to sand the whole side, 1000 sandpaper is great, the layers must be together
 
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6/8/22

I’ve finally done it. I trimmed the motherboard. To be honest, it was scary. My primary concern wasn’t ruining the motherboard, but my health and safety was a concern. It’s not worth getting cancer. I made sure to trim outside, wear protective eyewear, a KN-95 mask and gloves. Trimming the board itself was smooth sailing. My rotary tool did bounce a couple of times, but I don’t think (hopefully) I messed anything up.

I left myself some margin by not cutting at the line. I’m not sure if it’s necessary to sand it all the way to the line, so kindly let me know. I used 600, then 800, then 1000 on the motherboard when sanding, and it’s smooth like butter. Should I use 1200 grit or am I fine at 1000? I check the resistance of each point with a multimeter and got the following:



The lines not labeled, I had trouble measuring the voltages. I either couldn’t get a reading, no matter where I place the prongs, or possible made a mistake.

Instead of scratching traces in these areas, can I just solder the respective power lines to these points?

Another thing, I have a 79001 series PS2 but the motherboard resembles the 79003 picture more than the 79001. Is this normal? Also, how are my readings for the resistance?

Oh yes, one more thing,




View attachment 23098
Should I be concerned about these scratches? It seems to be a superficial scratch, only affecting the mask.
It doesn't seem to be a problem this scratch, use UV mask for protection
 
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6/8/22

I’ve finally done it. I trimmed the motherboard. To be honest, it was scary. My primary concern wasn’t ruining the motherboard, but my health and safety was a concern. It’s not worth getting cancer. I made sure to trim outside, wear protective eyewear, a KN-95 mask and gloves. Trimming the board itself was smooth sailing. My rotary tool did bounce a couple of times, but I don’t think (hopefully) I messed anything up.

I left myself some margin by not cutting at the line. I’m not sure if it’s necessary to sand it all the way to the line, so kindly let me know. I used 600, then 800, then 1000 on the motherboard when sanding, and it’s smooth like butter. Should I use 1200 grit or am I fine at 1000? I check the resistance of each point with a multimeter and got the following:



The lines not labeled, I had trouble measuring the voltages. I either couldn’t get a reading, no matter where I place the prongs, or possible made a mistake.

Instead of scratching traces in these areas, can I just solder the respective power lines to these points?

Another thing, I have a 79001 series PS2 but the motherboard resembles the 79003 picture more than the 79001. Is this normal? Also, how are my readings for the resistance?

Oh yes, one more thing,




View attachment 23098
Should I be concerned about these scratches? It seems to be a superficial scratch, only affecting the mask.
I don't know how to help you with the tension part, but the right thing is to use the scalpel and scrape the areas, apply the tensions following the image scheme
 

AFE123

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Alrighty, so I’ve basically recovered from COVID-19 (2 negative tests in a row. Adequate sample size in my opinion). It’s a pain in the ass, so its not worth getting it. On the bright side, I picked up the 3d printed fume extractor I designed then assembled it. It’s not the prettiest, but it works as intended. I’ve attached a video of the extractor in action.


I was also able to wire up the regulators and test them out for the first time.


If I’m not mistaken, I got the following readings.

1.79-1.83V on the linear reg (big green perfboard)
*Speaking up, It was a pain to wire up. First, I routed everything with solder, but got nothing, so I stripped 22 gauge wire, then soldered the wires to their appropriate places.

1.25V on the dot with the PTR reg.
*That was a pain to wire up.
2.49ish V on one PTH

3.5V on the dot with the other PTH.

Screen situation

I was able to modify the screen to run off 5V instead of 12V.

To do this, I removed the voltage regulator highlighted (It converts 4.35-40V to 5V), then soldered a wire from the output to the red wire as drawn in the pic. I also figured out that the screen draws around 360 milliamps, which is lower than I expected.

Here’s a video of the screen in action.

Besides that, that’s it. Before, I sanded my mommy board with 320 grit, then went up to 1000 grit. I’m planning on checking the resistance readings, but I’m not sure how to with the PS2. With the Wii, it seems straight forward, but the PS2 has, for example, 3 2.5V spots. Should I check the following points below? I have the numbers in parenthesis to differentiate the points.



Also, What readings should I look for? Is it based on I = V/R?


Edit: I've decided to just spill out the name I was planning. I'm calling my portable Chunchunmaru. Its from the anime, Konosuba (I'm surprised no one has named their portable Chunchunmaru). Definitely recommend checking it out if you are an anime fan.

Edit: I got the resistance readings, and Gman said that it doesn't really matter on the PS2. As long as you don't have a short, you're fine. I'll upload my readings later for reference.
 
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AFE123

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6/30/22

It’s been a while since I’ve last updated the worklog. I was able to get some wiring stuff done.

1657575084823.png

1657575242520.png

For the first go, I’m impressed. It’s a lot cleaner than I anticipated.

I was also able to wire up the regs entirely.
1657575215831.png

It’s not the cleanest, but I’ll work on it whenever I can. With that said, I do have a question about wiring the PTR08060. Assuming I have the time tomorrow, I’ll hopefully be able to work on the project and possibly power on the unit.

Does anyone have good pics for how to cleanly wire up the PTR reg? I’m afraid of the possibility of shorting stuff out so yeah.

Another question, will a 5V 2.4A power supply be enough to power up the ps2? It's the most convenient option for me, and according to V*A=W and Gman trimming initiative thread, the PS2 can run off a 5V with a minimum of 2.04 amps, but I haven't accounted for inefficiencies. I also saw a picture of a PS2 running off a 5V source.
 
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it was good installation, I think you can connect yes, my question is what minimum voltage it can turn off
 

AFE123

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it was good installation, I think you can connect yes, my question is what minimum voltage it can turn off
The PTH and PTR reg will run off a min of 4.5V. For the linear reg, it doesn't give a minimum. For the 5V reg, it does require a minimum of 6V, but I'm sure you can get a boost converter.
 

AFE123

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7/7/22

It’s been a while since I’ve last posted on my worklog. Last week, if I'm not mistaken, I went to test my PS2 motherboard, but it didn’t turn on. In retrospect, I used an alternate power source for the 1.8V linear reg and forgot to hook ground. It was an overall unplanned mess. With wired up regs, shorting is a concern, and ptr regs are the worst to wire up cleanly. For this reason, I’ve decided to venture into the world of PCB design. Learning the ins and outs of Kicad is simple enough, but having a community that’s willing to critique and help is integral to making everything work out.
After many prototypes, I’ve created a final board. I call it “a massive, but absolutely impractical PS2PMS. It’s not as compact and awesome as the old PMS and @Customledmods custom power board, but it'll do (I also didn't want to waste the components I already have). In addition to mounting holes for two PTH regs, one PTR and one generic 1.8 linear reg, it has mounting holes for a BMS, and holes for the TP5100 charging module. Needless to say, this isn’t my final design. I don’t have mounting holes, a power switch and many other things. Another thing I failed to notice is that the caps are above the input point. Question about that later.
Another thing I’m considering is a charge and play circuit. If I end up doing it, I’ll probably use the classic two port charge and play circuit. It’ll be the matter of slapping in a DPDT switch, messing with the wiring and that’s it. Another option that’s less out there is this charge and play circuit. I’ll have to buy more components, but I only have to mess around with fewer things.

With all that out of the way, here are some pics:





It’s not the greatest pcb design out there, but it does its job. I’d really appreciate feedback on this circuit. I used power planes, which is a helpful feature but it confuses me. As you can see, the power plane on the top connects the output of the PTH reg to the cap then to the output terminal. Will the current flow in that order or is there a risk of current flowing straight from the reg to the output terminal? Apologize for the weird wording, but I view circuits similarly to a pipeline. I also don’t think current is the best word to use in this context. I really don't want to f this up because getting pcb manufactured isn't as convenient as picking up a 3D print. From the looks of it, the only option for getting good quality PCBs is from jlc and pcbway (not sponsored, lol). Oshpark is stupid expensive and quality isn't good from what I've heard.
 

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7/7/22

It’s been a while since I’ve last posted on my worklog. Last week, if I'm not mistaken, I went to test my PS2 motherboard, but it didn’t turn on. In retrospect, I used an alternate power source for the 1.8V linear reg and forgot to hook ground. It was an overall unplanned mess. With wired up regs, shorting is a concern, and ptr regs are the worst to wire up cleanly. For this reason, I’ve decided to venture into the world of PCB design. Learning the ins and outs of Kicad is simple enough, but having a community that’s willing to critique and help is integral to making everything work out.
After many prototypes, I’ve created a final board. I call it “a massive, but absolutely impractical PS2PMS. It’s not as compact and awesome as the old PMS and @Customledmods custom power board, but it'll do (I also didn't want to waste the components I already have). In addition to mounting holes for two PTH regs, one PTR and one generic 1.8 linear reg, it has mounting holes for a BMS, and holes for the TP5100 charging module. Needless to say, this isn’t my final design. I don’t have mounting holes, a power switch and many other things. Another thing I failed to notice is that the caps are above the input point. Question about that later.
Another thing I’m considering is a charge and play circuit. If I end up doing it, I’ll probably use the classic two port charge and play circuit. It’ll be the matter of slapping in a DPDT switch, messing with the wiring and that’s it. Another option that’s less out there is this charge and play circuit. I’ll have to buy more components, but I only have to mess around with fewer things.

With all that out of the way, here are some pics:





It’s not the greatest pcb design out there, but it does its job. I’d really appreciate feedback on this circuit. I used power planes, which is a helpful feature but it confuses me. As you can see, the power plane on the top connects the output of the PTH reg to the cap then to the output terminal. Will the current flow in that order or is there a risk of current flowing straight from the reg to the output terminal? Apologize for the weird wording, but I view circuits similarly to a pipeline. I also don’t think current is the best word to use in this context. I really don't want to f this up because getting pcb manufactured isn't as convenient as picking up a 3D print. From the looks of it, the only option for getting good quality PCBs is from jlc and pcbway (not sponsored, lol). Oshpark is stupid expensive and quality isn't good from what I've heard.
(Imperfect explanation ahoy)

Electricity exists as something more like a waveform than a directed flow of water. The fluid metaphor is good for basic expressions of the concept, but in this case it's a little more complicated. Basically, all electricty has a sort of resonant pulse frequency by which current moves. It has ups and downs like a waveform. This is why power supplies will list their compatibile AC input voltages AND a Hz figure (50Hz or 60Hz). That frequency influences the entire function of the circuit, and a side effect of that is voltage ripple.

The filtering caps we use with the regulators function like a cyclical buffer to take in power at the peak of the wave, and then output that power as the wave drops to smooth it out. This reduction in the ripple prevents instability and excess heat build up in the system, which is quite important to sensitive digital systems. I've provided a picture to illustrate:

1657173535390.png

The rectified ripple is the output of the reg with no cap, and the smoothed ripple is the output of the reg with a proper filtering cap. As long as the caps are somewhere quite close to the reg, it's all good. They just absorb, buffer, and smooth the eb and flow, rather than directing and smoothing the entire current. For that you'd use an inductor and a different circuit type (which would still need filtering caps anyway).

Hopefully this makes sense, I'm a little fried atm
 

AFE123

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(Imperfect explanation ahoy)

Electricity exists as something more like a waveform than a directed flow of water. The fluid metaphor is good for basic expressions of the concept, but in this case it's a little more complicated. Basically, all electricty has a sort of resonant pulse frequency by which current moves. It has ups and downs like a waveform. This is why power supplies will list their compatibile AC input voltages AND a Hz figure (50Hz or 60Hz). That frequency influences the entire function of the circuit, and a side effect of that is voltage ripple.

The filtering caps we use with the regulators function like a cyclical buffer to take in power at the peak of the wave, and then output that power as the wave drops to smooth it out. This reduction in the ripple prevents instability and excess heat build up in the system, which is quite important to sensitive digital systems. I've provided a picture to illustrate:

View attachment 23577
The rectified ripple is the output of the reg with no cap, and the smoothed ripple is the output of the reg with a proper filtering cap. As long as the caps are somewhere quite close to the reg, it's all good. They just absorb, buffer, and smooth the eb and flow, rather than directing and smoothing the entire current. For that you'd use an inductor and a different circuit type (which would still need filtering caps anyway).

Hopefully this makes sense, I'm a little fried atm
Thanks for clearing everything up! With the confirmation, I've finally completed the larger and less practical PS2PMS. I've implemented the one port charge or play circuit. Compared to the two port, the one port was the easiest to implement. For charging, I'm planning on usb USB type C PD since it's damn convenient. My final design in its full glory.
*old design removed*

Edit: So I've revised the design because having everything on one piece would be more expensive. Instead I made two separate boards. I'm very hyped to put it all together and test my motherboard. Since it's from JLC, it'll take two weeks, but I'll be too busy to work on it anyways with summer classes and stuff. Without further ado, here are the boards.

1657501150493.png

This board contains mounts for the PTH08080WAS and PTR08060something something. Wiring regs is messy and might cause a short. Hot glue would help, but hot glue seems weird in the new age of 3D printing. Also, wiring input and output regs on the PTR reg is difficult. I lost the pins the regs originally came with, but I found that 20 gauge copper Jewelry wire I had worked. It fits in the reg holes perfectly. It's not good on bassoon reeds, but it'll work like a charm on the regs.
1657501185566.png

This is the charging module I have. It uses a generic amazon BMS, the TP5100 and a four way switch. Like previously mentioned, I've decided on using Ashen's charge or play circuit. In reality, I don't need charge and play (I can't see myself playing for more than an hour), but it would be a disgrace to not have. I was originally considering the two port method, but it'd be a pain to implement that in my circuit board, so I went with Ashen's method.
 
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